One of the properties highlighted in the Detroit News article on arsons on this block. This specific property’s assessed value was $9,300, had not paid taxes since 2007, and owed $14,000 in back taxes.
You can see the updated survey of this property at Motor City Mapping. One of the properties highlighted in the Detroit News article on arsons on this block. This specific property’s assessed value was $9,300, had not paid taxes since 2007, and owed $14,000 in back taxes.
You can see the updated survey of this property at Motor City Mapping. One of the properties highlighted in the Detroit News article on arsons on this block. This specific property’s assessed value was $9,300, had not paid taxes since 2007, and owed $14,000 in back taxes.
You can see the updated survey of this property at Motor City Mapping. One of the properties highlighted in the Detroit News article on arsons on this block. This specific property’s assessed value was $9,300, had not paid taxes since 2007, and owed $14,000 in back taxes.
You can see the updated survey of this property at Motor City Mapping. One of the properties highlighted in the Detroit News article on arsons on this block. This specific property’s assessed value was $9,300, had not paid taxes since 2007, and owed $14,000 in back taxes.
You can see the updated survey of this property at Motor City Mapping.

One of the properties highlighted in the Detroit News article on arsons on this block. This specific property’s assessed value was $9,300, had not paid taxes since 2007, and owed $14,000 in back taxes.

You can see the updated survey of this property at Motor City Mapping.

This is from a fantastic Detroit News article this morning on the toll of arson on a Detroit block.

Since 2000, the city has averaged an extraordinary 4,000 - 5,000 fires per year — the majority presumed to be intentional.

Over July 4th weekend alone this summer, there were 100+ fires in Detroit.

Article here: http://www.detroitnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014307160032
The house on the right sold for $71,500 in 2006. It was tax foreclosed several years later. The house on the right sold for $71,500 in 2006. It was tax foreclosed several years later. The house on the right sold for $71,500 in 2006. It was tax foreclosed several years later. The house on the right sold for $71,500 in 2006. It was tax foreclosed several years later.

The house on the right sold for $71,500 in 2006. It was tax foreclosed several years later.

At LOVELAND Technologies, we’ve updated Detroit’s Tax Distress Map on Why Don’t We Own This and found that only 38% of Detroit property owners are paying their property taxes — that’s down from 50% just a year ago. 

Tax foreclosure continues to gut Detroit. This is the whole ball game for the future of the city, and palliative solutions won’t cure a systemic problem.

There are $700 million in uncollected taxes across the city and 100,000 properties subject to foreclosure (haven’t paid taxes in >3 years).

The New York Times has a front page story on the subject this morning, too:http://nyti.ms/UPQVeM

No structures or taxes, but this overgrowth is impressive. No structures or taxes, but this overgrowth is impressive. No structures or taxes, but this overgrowth is impressive. No structures or taxes, but this overgrowth is impressive.

No structures or taxes, but this overgrowth is impressive.

The two on the right are City of Detroit owned. The middle one sold for $47,000 in 2006. Since then, tax foreclosure and, clearly, a fire. The two on the right are City of Detroit owned. The middle one sold for $47,000 in 2006. Since then, tax foreclosure and, clearly, a fire. The two on the right are City of Detroit owned. The middle one sold for $47,000 in 2006. Since then, tax foreclosure and, clearly, a fire. The two on the right are City of Detroit owned. The middle one sold for $47,000 in 2006. Since then, tax foreclosure and, clearly, a fire.

The two on the right are City of Detroit owned. The middle one sold for $47,000 in 2006. Since then, tax foreclosure and, clearly, a fire.